Positive Behavioral Interventions
and Supports (PBIS)

This article offers a comprehensive introduction to PBIS with opportunities for readers to dive deeper into topics of their choice. It is a great starting point for caregivers and educators new to PBIS.

This article outlines what PBIS looks like specifically for students with disabilities, how it aligns with the IDEA, and what families can do to advocate for their students. It is a helpful stepping stone for families and educators to gain a deeper understanding of how PBIS can be implemented for their students in the classroom. This article was published in 2019, so it is advised readers double check any date-sensitive information. Go to https://dredf.org/ for more information on disability rights.

This peer-reviewed journal article investigates how students with disabilities are included (or not) within PBIS in schools. It is a great resource for an educator familiar with PBIS to investigate how it functions within special education and what improvements can be implemented. The article can be rented with a free trial or purchased for a one time fee. [citation: Shuster BC, Gustafson JR, Jenkins AB, Lloyd BP, Carter EW, Bernstein CF. Including Students With Disabilities in Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Experiences and Perspectives of Special Educators. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions. 2017;19(3):143-157. doi:10.1177/1098300716675734]

Here you can find a 2 page, easy-to-read guide from Massachusetts on PBIS within the state. This is a great read for those looking to get more acquainted with PBIS within the Massachusetts school system.

This peer-reviewed journal article explores how to improve student supports through social and emotional learning, culturally responsive practices, and PBIS. It is most helpful for educators seeking to use innovative approaches to better support their students in the classroom and parents wanting to understand how educators can better support their students. Dr. James Cressey also presented on this topic via a webinar through the Chris Walsh Center for Educators and Families of MetroWest at Framingham State University on October 29, 2019. [citation: Cressey, J. (2019). Developing culturally responsive social, emotional, and behavioral supports. Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, 12(1), 53–67. https://doi.org/10.1108/JRIT-01-2019-0015]

This resource outlines an innovative approach to culturally responsive PBIS by using problem-solving and collaboration. It is an ideal site for educators looking to take a deeper dive into culturally responsive PBIS and how to implement it in their schools. Explore the rest of the site at http://www.crpbis.org/index.html for specific learning labs, resources, and publications. The project is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at University of Wisconsin-Madison’s School of Education. Some information on the site is from as early as 2012, so date-sensitive information should be double-checked.

This resource describes families’ roles in PBIS, and it provides tools to help foster involvement. It is an ideal resource for caregivers seeking to understand their role in PBIS and for educators wanting to improve parent engagement in PBIS.

This webinar presented by the Chris Walsh Center for Educators and Families of MetroWest features Dr. James Cressey discussing how social and emotional learning, culturally responsive practices, and PBIS can be combined in the classroom. It is an excellent resource for educators wanting to better support their students through an intersectional teaching approach.

This site offers tons of free speaker videos from experts in the field sharing insight into specific parts of PBIS. Topics range from PBIS Implementation in Rural Settings to sitting in on teams as they discuss PBIS implementation. This site is ideal for educators who are familiar with PBIS and want to learn more about niche topics of interest.

This page was last updated on: 06/09/2021
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