Social-Emotional Learning (SEL)

Here you can find a basic introduction to what SEL is and how it benefits students in the classroom.

This resource includes SEL activities for families and educators. It breaks down which activities are appropriate for each setting. This is an excellent resource for families wanting to engage in SEL activities with their children at home. The site includes many external links, which may not all be up to date.

This quick list gives caregivers 11 tips to help them better support their children with learning disabilities. It’s a great resource for parents just getting familiar with learning disabilities or parents who are looking for new ways to support their children.

This article offers a digestible overview of the benefits of SEL for students and how SEL can be implemented within the classroom via school, family, and community partnerships. It is a great starting point for educators and parents interested in knowing more about SEL and how they can be involved in it. The article is from 2016, so date-sensitive information should be double-checked. 

This peer-reviewed research article explores the impact of transformative SEL, a new framework to increase equity in the classroom. The article is relatively dense, and it is ideal for a teacher familiar with SEL and its use in the classroom. [citation: Jagers, R., Rivas-Drake, D., & Williams, B. (2019). Transformative Social and Emotional Learning (SEL): Toward SEL in Service of Educational Equity and Excellence. Educational Psychologist, 54, 162 - 184.]

Here readers can find 75 free SEL activities for elementary and middle school students. This site is helpful for educators who are interested in implementing new SEL activities in their classroom.

This peer-reviewed journal article explores how to improve student supports through social and emotional learning, culturally responsive practices, and PBIS. It is most helpful for educators seeking to use innovative approaches to better support their students in the classroom and parents wanting to understand how educators can better support their students. Dr. James Cressey also presented on this topic via a webinar through the Chris Walsh Center for Educators and Families of MetroWest at Framingham State University on October 29, 2019. [citation: Cressey, J. (2019). Developing culturally responsive social, emotional, and behavioral supports. Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, 12(1), 53–67. https://doi.org/10.1108/JRIT-01-2019-0015]

This page was last updated on: 06/09/2021
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